Subject: Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2000 23:57:32 +0100
From: "dimbit"

I've had a rethink of gradient and derivative, and I came to the conclusion that perhaps the derivative of a function f(x), will give the rate of change of f(x) with respect to x. That is what I meant to say when I talked about "represents the gradient". In my question, g(x) was the derivative of f(x), so when I said that it represented the gradient of the graph of f(x) I.e. the rate of change of f(x) with respect to x, I was meaning the same thing.

gradient of a function f(x) - the rate of change of f(x) with respect to x

On a graph of f(x), the gradient at a point (x , f(x)) is the value of the derivative of f(x) at x.

I can't think of a way to describe the gradient to you in any other way, if this definition also falls below the levels of acceptability, then I would like it if you might help me a little, so I know what I am talking about?

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